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Vision Therapy

Sight is not the same as vision. “Sight” is a physical process of focusing light within our eyes, whereas “vision” involves our ability to understand what is seen.

It is estimated that as much as 80 percent of all learning during a child’s first 12 years comes through vision.

Because a child has 20/20 visual acuity according to the Snellen Test (eye chart) does NOT mean he or she has good vision. The eye chart used by most schools for visual screening assesses if a child is able to identify letters at a distance that a normal child would be expected to see 20 feet away.

The Snellen Test does not identify the following problems:

  • Near focusing (most learning occurs while reading from a book and working at a desk)
  • Eye coordination (using both eyes together) and focusing
  • Convergence (aiming the eyes inward for near targets)
  • Eye movement and tracking
  • Depth perception and peripheral vision
  • Visualization
  • Strabismus (crossed or wandering eye)

While statistics show vision disorders are the number one handicapping condition for children, according to the American Foundation for Vision Awareness, use of the Snellen chart alone only identifies five percent of the vision problems in children.

Schedule your appointment today with Dr. Brett Miller for a diagnostic examination to determine if a visual dysfunction is present, one that has not been detected thus far with the standard eye chart.